Laying down the lawn

Phase2StartingOnTheLawnDiggingConiferRootsConiferRootLevellingForBenchPrepLawn1ReadyForTurfDamoLawn1DamoEdgingLawnSarahEdgingLawnFinshedLawnThe front garden has been looking scruffy for a couple of years, but has never taken priority over the back garden or allotment. This year, with weather forecasts of a hot, sunny summer, we decided it would be a good time to finish off our only south facing spot so we had somewhere to sit.

This was too big a job for us to do on our own in a reasonable amount of time, so our good friend Richard came to help. He started by putting a raised bed along the path. I wanted a border to plant sun loving perennials and annuals.

The following fortnight, he came back to help remove the majority of topsoil and old turf so we could level the surface. He also edged the top border with the same tanalised timber. We also spent time taking out some of the awful moisture sapping conifer roots from our neighbour’s hedge that had been bothering our old lawn.

We also decided that levelling the slope would be worthwhile so we could move our garden bench there. Due to the conifers, we decided to not use that area as little will grow well, so we thought plum slate chippings would work well.

We watched You Tube clips like this of how to turf a lawn, not having done it before. Alan Titchmarsh always made it look so easy! We added sterilised organic topsoil and raked to a fine tilth.
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We had the turves delivered on the Friday afternoon, so they were fresh. They had been collected by our supplier from Lincolnshire that morning. Excellent service from Northern Turf who came well recommended. We opted for rye grass as we need a hard wearing lawn with children and a dog. We paid £2.75/m.

After work, we set about laying them. With a space as small as this, Damian made short work of it. Because of the straight edges from the borders it easy to align, and knitting the edges together isn’t difficult. The trickiest thing is lifting the turves – they’re quite heavy.
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We keep an old bread knife for gardening, and even though it was tough to cut, it gave good results.
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For the rockery in the corner, we sprinkled top soil to ‘draw’ the curve, and used the bread knife again.
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A well deserved beer after a good evening’s work!

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